Another four-star review for “A Book About a Film”

Ajoobacats Blog gave A Book About a Film a ★★★★ review. Full review below:

This rather unusual read is a fictional account of a lost film or a film that never existed according to the hype in the book called The Cornfield People (aka Operation D-minor and The Phantom), which is about the secret of life and broadly speaking about the secrets held by a cult of near death survivors who will do anything to protect their cult and the secret they know.

When one of their own flees them and tries to give this secret to a journalist at a Paranormal magazine, Joe Fischer, the journalist in question must jump through a series of hoops to find validity in this bizarre tale and get to the bottom of this secret in order to write his expose.

Written as a scene by scene account of this mysterious film and annotated with editorialized footnotes (which incidentally don’t work very well on Kindle as the author has not taken advantage of the Word Wise feature to aid readers by simplifying the text) from various legendary filmmakers, like Ridley Scott and Tarantino, this is one hell of a read for film enthusiasts and though I would never describe myself as a film enthusiast I did get swept away by the mystery contained in this elusive novel. I have never read a book from this author before but I found A Book About A Film, an original, if not unusual read.

However, as much as I enjoyed it the lack of formatting on ereader and the frequent typos made this probably the most difficult ebook I have read to date

Kirkus reviews “A Book About a Film”

Got any books released after the 1980s on your bookshelf? Maybe something by Stephen King? Jack Ketchum? George R. R. Martin? Of course you do. Go ahead and grab one, and take a look either on the back cover or the first couple of pages. Odds are, there will be an excerpt from Kirkus Reviews. Well, they had a chance to read A Book About a Film and had some pretty nice things say. Read the full review below, and stay tuned for more as September 8th approaches.

Schultz’s (Jill, 2012, etc.) novel looks at the apocrypha surrounding an infamous lost film.

In this metafictional work, a fictionalized version of the author describes a film that he claims is real, although he acknowledges that many people believe it to be an urban legend. At the same time, he attempts to publish this account with a fictional publisher. If the plot sounds tangled, that’s sort of the point, as this novel is set in the underground world of rare, lost, and legendary independent films, where the smoke and mirrors surrounding a movie can prove more deceptive than those used to make it. The film, known as The Cornfield People, among other titles, is a low-budget neo-noir shot between 1999 and 2001. It follows a journalist at a paranormal publication investigating the eponymous secret society, which is willing to go to great lengths to protect their esoteric knowledge of life and death. The book opens with a foreword explaining that this book is actually the second edition of A Book About a Film, the first having been so explosive that the publisher was forced to redact it, due to an apparent shadowy conspiracy working to keep all knowledge of the film from the public. Even so, “there are still many out there who object to this version as well, as they believe what is reported in these texts are a threat to everyone,” says the foreword’s author. Schultz then offers an annotated, scene-by-scene account of the film, along with supplementary materials; the texts become progressively more sinister as the film’s plot begins to bleed into events of the “real” world. Overall, the novel’s conceit is rather ingenious. However, the author unfortunately gets in his own way when it comes to its execution. The story’s tension is undercut by its jocular tone, and the author isn’t enough of a skilled ventriloquist to successfully mimic the array of critics and film experts whose quotes populate the text. Additionally, the film at the center of book simply isn’t persuasive enough to support all the marginalia. Although this book is fun at times, readers will be left wishing that it had just a bit more polish.

A story with a great premise that never quite takes flight.

Another rave review for “A Book About a Film”

Joanie Chevalier, author of Deadly Dating Games: Murder. Blackmail. Romance., endorsed A Book About a Film, giving it a ★★★★★ (out of five) review!

C.W. Schultz is a brilliant author. Or is he? Writing a book about a film about Joe Fisher’s experience while investigating the Cornfield People, a secret society that knows the meaning of life and what comes after death, calls for a medal of bravery or dare I say it aloud, a badge of stupidity. There are many out there who believe that anything written about this subject is a threat and even those interviewed advised not to release the book due to safety issues. Because of this, I am not really the reviewer/author named Joanie Chevalier. I don’t want my life threatened in any way; I love my life. Therefore, I hacked into Ms. Chevalier’s computer and I shall remain anonymous. This is all I care to say on this subject.

Just like the man on camera, I too, enjoy an apple martini every now and then and now I have the knowledge of things that are better left unknown. But is this a gift or a curse? Just like any good reviewer, I analyzed the research given about the Cornfield People and noticed that some called it a cult. Cults are scary and while I appreciate the fact that the author couldn’t get his book properly edited out of fear, it is a crime to subject readers to the kind of erRors we were burdened with. That, and the hundreds of footnotes which were reminiscent of expensive heavy college textbooks.

The author dared to state his opinion in Fn. 98 [or was it Fn. 96?] that Cornfield Persons are clowns. Reading in context, the author wrote, “these Cornfield Persons look like a bunch of clowns.” I respectfully write this in quotations so that certain persons would know it was not me who originally dare write these words down on paper. However, coming to the defense of C.W. Schultz, I concluded from the author’s other remarks that this was probably a cover up for his true fear. Writing about red-herrings is probably a cover up too, with Mr. C.W. Schultz presenting us with a “journal,” a silly “song,” and a “word search” (email me if you too find the phrase “Cornfield People are Clowns” diagonally and backwards in the red herring word search).

The Cornfield People are a proud society and was formed over a hundred years ago. I dare you to google who was alive back then; you may be surprised. Read the book. See for yourself. Find the answer to the question: Is it possible to hang yourself with a coat hanger? Only C.W. Schultz can bring that answer to light as he courageously researches and writes, A Book About A Film. I commend you Mr. C.W. Schultz. Thank you for giving me more questions than answers.

Fn. 56 [Note: Footnotes 1 through 55 must NOT be read by the public.] The day after I finished the book, I noticed a suspicious looking man dressed in a burlap sack (I just thought he was homeless, sorry) eagerly looking over my shoulder as I was typing the review during my lunch break while sitting on a bench at the park. The next day I found a sheet of paper under my windshield. All it had were five symbols, drawn in red crayon: stars. I took this to mean only one thing – to rate this book 5 stars . . . or else. I rest my case. Fade to Black.

See the author’s website for more information: Cornfield People

4th Book – coming in 2015

C. W. Schultz’s fourth book A Book About a Film is set to be released in late 2015. Marketing and press releases will be throughout the year.

An academic study on the cult classic The Cornfield People, A Book About a Film not only acts as a novelization of the movie but also dedicates a great amount of its content to the film’s hidden messages, reoccurring themes and haunting obscurity. Some have called The Cornfield People an incomplete film, while others believe it is a true lost film; however, many believe that the film is banned and have pointed out that sites which attempt to host images or clips from the movie have suspiciously removed the content even though there is no trace of The Cornfield People ever being copyrighted.

Paperback and Kindle editions will be available at the same time, but a hardback release is currently tentative. Due to the book’s unique page layout, paperback is the recommended edition and is expected to have a starting price of $16.99 (likely cheaper), with signed copies and giveaway opportunities within the first few months of release. For more information on giveaways and signed copies, please use the contact form.

For other questions or to discuss Schultz’s upcoming release, please feel free to post in the comment section below.

Geekster on Movies

Background final copy

Geekster on Movies, a fun film blog of capsule reviews and prizes, mentions C. W. Schultz’s upcoming book, A Book About a Film.

Geekser on Movies‘ main blogger Randy has been doing thorough research on the same subject that Schultz is covering in A Book About a Film.

Geekster on Movies is the place to be if you like film, want to discuss it with other fans, maybe learn something new about your favorite flick, get a good laugh or two, and perhaps even win a prize. Check it out.

Schultz speaks about 4th novel

C. W. Schultz opens up a little more about his fourth novel A Book About a Film:

I reached a 55,600 word-count today. That’s officially longer than Yeval, which I believe is just around 55,000 words. Now, higher word-count does not mean higher quality. No! But the fact that I have a published book shorter than the one I’m currently working on really puts into perspective the fact that A Book About a Film is really happening, and that makes me very excited! There were a lot of projects up my sleeve at the time I started A Book About a Film, and I honestly didn’t know if I was going to follow through with it or if I was going to cancel it or if I was going to get sidetracked or whatever. The get-go on this book was definitely my most difficult. I had three false-starts, starting a new version from scratch almost every eight weeks, before I actually reached this point-of-no-return, and I’m just thrilled to let the world see it within, hopefully, the next year or so.

Cool stuff. Stay tuned for more!

“A Book About a Film”‘s Estimated Word-Count & Progress

Schultz says that A Book About a Film, the title of his upcoming fourth novel that was announced on February 2nd, 2014, will be around 65,000 words (which, to give some context, is about 10,000 words more than his debut novel Yeval) and that he is over 2/3 of the way done with his first draft. Rest assured, there will be more frequent website updates in the near future; but remember what Schultz said when he finished the first draft of his third novel Jill:

Now the hard part… editing!

Stay tuned!